Hearing Aids

the path to better hearing.

Schedule a Consultation

Hearing Aids

the path to better hearing.

Schedule a Consultation

Our Philosophy

We take the time to understand what you need from your hearing aids. Whether you spend a lot of time outdoors, prefer one-on-one conversations at home, or like to keep up with the latest technology, there’s a hearing aid out there to suit your lifestyle.  We fit our patients with the hearing aid that we know will address their hearing loss and their lifestyle needs.

Hearing Aid Vendors

Phonak

Continuously challenging the limits of technology to help overcome even the most difficult hearing situations. Phonak has the right hearing aid for you.  Learn more about the latest key technologies available from Phonak.

ReSound

Your hearing experience should address your unique needs. The ReSound ecosystem of hearing aids, apps and wireless accessories let you adapt to all kinds of environments and situations and makes sure you hear the sounds you want to hear. 

Oticon

People First is a promise: That everything we do always begins with the people we are doing it for. We are not simply trying to help you hear more, but to live more.  Designed to help you communicate, interact and participate fully in

Signia

Signia hearing aids deliver the sound that nature intended by combining uncompromised audibility with a natural sounding own voice. Our elegant state-of-the-art solutions replicate the natural experience of hearing everything in harmony.

Starkey

Starkey is much more than the hearing aids they produce. Starkey is an experience that doesn’t merely promise more, but delivers more: more communication, more participation, and more opportunities to do what you love.

Widex

We combine years of understanding with a natural curiosity in finding solutions to individual hearing loss. Our uncompromising approach to innovation has led to the world’s first fully digital in-the-ear hearing aid.

Is it Time to Get Hearing Aids?

If you’re reading this, you already suspect you might need hearing aids.  If you answer yes to two or more questions below, it’s probably time to give us a call.

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Others complain that the TV is too loud.

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Your significant other and you argue over what you heard.

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You use the phrases, “excuse me”, “can you repeat that”, or “what did you say” several times a day.

New experiences that you would’ve jumped at 5 years ago no longer hold the same appeal.

You plan your nights out based on how loud it might be at your destination.

How are Hearing Aids Today different?

A hearing aid is a small electronic device that you wear in or behind your ear. It makes some sounds louder so that a person with hearing loss can listen, communicate, and participate more fully in daily activities.

There are three basic parts to a hearing aid: a microphone, amplifier, and speaker. The basics haven’t changed for decades.  What has change significantly is how a hearing aid manipulates the sound as it enters the hearing aid and eventually sends the signal into your ear canal. Theses advances include:

  • Automatic volume adjustments
  • Automatic adaptation to background noise
  • Built in FM, Infrared and Bluetooth technology
  • Water resistant technology
  • Hearing aids look better than ever before coming in a variety of shapes, colors and styles

 

 

1. Is there a link between hearing loss and age?
There is a strong relationship between age and reported hearing loss: 18 percent of American adults 45-64 years old, 30 percent of adults 65-74 years old, and 47 percent of adults 75 years old or older have a hearing loss.
2. Are there different styles of hearing aids?

There are three basic styles of hearing aids. The styles differ by size, their placement on or inside the ear, and the degree to which they amplify sound.

Behind the Ear Hearing Aids

Behind the ear (BTE) hearing aids consist of a small device worn behind the ear and connected to a plastic earmold that fits inside the outer ear. The electronic parts are held in the case behind the ear. Sound travels from the hearing aid through the earmold and into the ear. BTE aids are used by people of all ages for mild to profound hearing loss. A new kind of BTE aid is an open-fit hearing aid.

Small, open-fit aids fit behind the ear completely, with only a narrow tube inserted into the ear canal, enabling the canal to remain open. For this reason, open-fit hearing aids may be a good choice for people who experience a buildup of earwax, since this type of aid is less likely to be damaged by such substances.

In the Ear Hearing Aids

In the ear (ITE) hearing aids fit completely inside the outer ear and are used for mild to severe hearing loss. Some ITE aids may have certain added features installed, such as a telecoil. This makes it easier to hear conversations over the telephone.

A telecoil also helps people hear in public facilities that have installed special sound systems, called induction loop systems. Induction loop systems can be found in many churches, schools, airports, and auditoriums. ITE aids usually are not worn by young children because the casings need to be replaced often as the ear grows.

Canal Hearing Aids

Canal aids fit into the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is made to fit the size and shape of a person’s ear canal. A completely-in-canal (CIC) hearing aid is nearly hidden in the ear canal. Both types are used for mild to moderately severe hearing loss.

Because they are small, canal aids are more difficult for a person to adjust and remove. In addition, canal aids have less space available for batteries and additional devices, such as a telecoil. They usually are not recommended for young children or for people with severe to profound hearing loss because their reduced size limits their power and volume.

3. Is it possible to lose your hearing suddenly?
Approximately 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss affects only 1 ear in 9 out of 10 people who experience sudden deafness. Only 10 to 15 percent of patients with sudden deafness know what caused their loss.
4. Who is the typical person suffering from tinnitus?
Of adults ages 65 and older in the United States, 12.3 percent of men and nearly 14 percent of women are affected by tinnitus. Tinnitus is identified more frequently in white individuals and the prevalence of tinnitus is almost twice as frequent in the South as in the Northeast.
5. How many adults could benefit from hearing aids?
Approximately 28.8 million adults in the United States alone could benefit from using hearing aids.

Assistive Listening Devices

The term Assistive Listening Devices or ALDs can refer to any device that helps a person with hearing loss to communicate. With the development of digital and wireless technologies, more and more devices are becoming available to help people with hearing disorders communicate more meaningfully and participate more fully in their daily lives.

Types of ALDs

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hearing loop (or induction loop) systems

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fm systems

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infrared systems

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personal amplifiers

Nyce Hearing Center

Location

42 63rd St, Willowbrook, Illinois 60527

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Office Hours

Mon & Wed: 9:00am – 7:00pm
Tues, Thur & Sat: By appointment only
Fri: 9:00am – 3:00pm

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